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The undiscovered mind: how the human brain defies replication,


Description: The undiscovered mind: how the human brain defies replication,
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Psychological Science

John Horgan

Psychological Science

Vol. 10, No. 6 (Nov., 1999), pp. 470-474

Published by: Sage Publications, Inc. on behalf of the Association for Psychological Science

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40063472

Page Count: 5

  • Psychological Science

    Description: Psychological Science, the flagship journal of the Association for Psychological Science, is one of the premier journals in its field, with a citation ranking/impact factor that places it in the top 10 psychology journals worldwide. The journal publishes authoritative articles of interest across all of scientific psychology's subdisciplines, including the behavioral, clinical, cognitive, neural, and social sciences. In addition to these full-length articles, Psychological Science also features short summaries of new research developments.

    Coverage: 1990-2010 (Vol. 1, No. 1 - Vol. 21, No. 12)

    ISSN: 09567976

    EISSN: 14679280

    Subjects: Social Sciences, Psychology

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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Undiscovered Mind: How the Human Brain Defies Replication, Medication, and Explanation

Abstract

In The End of Science, I argued that particle physics, cosmology, evolutionary biology, and other fields of pure science have entered an era of diminishing returns (Horgan, 1997). Although scientists will continue refining and extending current theories and applying their knowledge in the realms of technology and medicine, they may never again achieve insights into nature as profound as quantum mechanics, relativity theory, the big bang theory, natural selection, and DNA-based genetics. One reasonable objection to the book was that mind-related research, of all current scientific enterprises, has the most revolutionary potential, and it deserves a more thorough treatment than it received in The End of Science. I responded to this objection by writing a book that focused on "mind-science " (Horgan, 1999). The Undiscovered Mind considered not only the debate over consciousness, which was the primary focus of The End of Science; it also reviewed the record of fields such as clinical psychology, psychiatry, behavioral genetics, evolutionary psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuroscience. I contended that there has been little progress in understanding the mind, replicating its properties, or treating its disorders--especially compared with the extravagant claims made by proponents of certain approaches. In this article, I summarize some of my book's main points.

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Psychological Science © 1999 Association for Psychological Science

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